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  • Zhongyang Dajie (中央大街; Zhōngyāngdàjiē; lit. Central Avenue), (Runs from Jingwei Jie to Stalin Park at the river).
  • Pretty much closes by 22:00 (weekend nights included). This cobblestone lined street is a pedestrian only street that could serve as a perfect remnant of the bustling international business activities at the turn of the 20th century. The 1.4-km long street is a veritable museum of European architectural styles, including Baroque and Byzantine facades, Jewish architectural wonders, a Russian restauraunt, French fashion houses (Fake Chinese Brands), American snack food outlets (McDonald's and KFC and a Chinese owned "American Bar"), and a Japanese restaurant. In winter, one can walk out onto the ice or take a dog sledge or horse sledge ride. It is the prettiest site in Harbin as far as the city itself is concerned, however, if you go mid-day during the weekend be prepared to push through the crowds.


  • Harbin International Ice and Snow Sculpture Festival (Harbin Ice Festival 2014), Ice & Snow World, Sun Island and Zhaolin Park
  • Annual opening on January 5th, lasts from December 1 and to February 28 next year.. By far Harbin's biggest claim to fame are these two-month-long events covering Chinese Spring Festival and Lantern Festival within the duration . While smaller ice and snow lanterns can be found allover the city, there are three major sites with large scale lanterns being displayed


  • St. Sophia Cathedral (圣索非亚教堂; Shèngsuǒfēiyàjiàotáng), (Daoli District on the corner of Zhaolin and Toulong Sts).
  • One of the few still standing Orthodox churches in the city. It is now converted into a Harbin Museum of Architecture. Inside there are exhibitions of many photographs from old times. Definitely worth going into, however, if you are used to European Churches do not expect the quality. Entrance fee is ¥20.


  • Sun Island (太阳岛; Tàiyángdǎo), (On the banks of the Songhua River and can be reached by ferry boat (¥5)).
  • Park offering a pleasant to stroll during the warmer months and on the weekends newly married couples can be seen taking pictures. In the winter it becomes part of the snow sculpture festivities. However, as with everything in Harbin, the park itself is still very chinese with a cage full of squirrels, a petting deer area (just have to buy them some food), go carts, a pond that is just full of turtles, and newly weds sporting bright colored dresses. It can also be reached by cable car, the station of which is in a hotel near Stalin Park (¥50)


  • Siberian Tiger Preserve (老虎公园; Lǎohǔgōngyuán), (Just a ¥40 cab ride from the city center (don't have them wait for you; you will always be able to find a ride home)).
  • This is without a doubt Harbin's "must see". Not for the faint hearted or obsessive animal lovers. There are literally hundreds of tigers in multiple huge pens. If you want to go by bus instead of taking a taxi, take the 88 line (facing the train station, walk into the small street on your left for 300 m before seeing the bus stop) to Shangye Daxue 商业大学. It should take about 30 minutes, and it is the third stop after the long stretch of highway crossing the river. Then, take the 54 bus towards the same direction, and you will see the entrance to the Tiger Park on your right after 5 minutes or so (Bus 54 didn't function in Dec 2013). Alternatively you can take the 88 line to the last stop, go straight and on the first crossroad go right for about 5 minutes. Another route is to taking Bus 29 at the north end of Zhaolin Da Jie city bus terminal for 2 RMB. For just ¥90 you can ride in an open bus with metal caging around it. The ride is about an hour long and while on the bus you can purchase strips of meat (¥20) to hand feed the tigers. Live chickens (¥60), pheasants (¥120), ducks (¥120), goats (¥800) and even cows (¥2800).